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NEMRUT PYRAMID MOUND – TURKEY

Introduction :

The Adiyaman Province of Turkey in the south east of the country is not wealthy – it is still classified as a developing rural region. Yet 25 miles from the small town of Kâhta the visitor discovers the remnants of once fabulous wealth.  High on the summit of Mount Nemrut is a huge but little visited necropolis, home to the beheaded gods of the past.

History :

When the Seleucid Empire was defeated by the Romans in 190 BC at the Battle of Magnesia it began to fall apart and new kingdoms were established on its territory by local authorities. Commagene, one of the Seleucid successor states, occupied a land between the Taurus mountains and the Euphrates. The state of Commagene had a wide range of cultures which left its leader from 62 BC – 38 BC Antiochus I Theos to carry on a peculiar dynastic religious program, which included not only Armenian, Greek and Persian deities but Antiochus and his family as well. This religious program was very possibly an attempt by Antiochus to unify his multiethnic kingdom and secure his dynasty’s authority.

Antiochus supported the cult as a propagator of happiness and salvation. Many of the ruins on Mount Nemrud are monuments of the imperial cult of Commagene. The most important area to the cult was the tomb of Antiochus I, which was decorated with colossal statues made of limestone. Although the imperial cult did not last long after Antiochus, several of his successors had their own tombs built on Mount Nemrud. For around half of the year, Mount Nemrud is covered in snow, the effect of which increases weathering, which has in part caused the statues to fall in ruin.

Geometry :

Nemrut or Nemrud is a 2,134 m (7,001 ft) high mountain in southeastern Turkey. It’s famous touristic attraction because of the mount summit where a number of large statues are erected around what is assumed to be a royal man-made pyrmaidal mound tomb from the 1st century BC. The 50 meters high artificial peak built on top from local materials as stone and soil with clay. It was constructed as a tomb for King Antinochus I during the period 80 – 72 BC. The architects of the tomb according to the will of the king placed the tomb closest to the sky (heaven) as possible. We can see the same tradition in China during the Tang Dynasty (7-10 centuries AD) when emperors situated their burial tombs at the inner lodgments of the highest natural mountains in modern Shaanxi province.

Source : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Nemrut,
http://www.kuriositas.com/2011/10/mount-nemrut-home-to-gods-beheaded.html